Find Journals: The Easy Way

This is a quick and easy way to find an article from a citation.

Winsler, A., Ducenne, L., & Koury, A. (2011). Singing one’s way to self-regulation: The role of early music and movement curricula and private speech. Early Education and Development, 22(2), 274-304

The best way is to copy and paste the journal title into the library’s homepage search box. Make sure you select the Find Journals button. Librarian tip: sometimes and and & in titles are interchangeable and sometimes they are not – if one doesn’t work try the other.

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After checking our citation and the date range of the two databases, and publisher website we can jump start things by typing in the title of the article in the journal’s search box. Writing an author’s name would also work (if you have to choose – select the more unusual surname).

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We’ve struck gold! The article comes up straight way.

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This way of searching is part of EBSCOhost’s Discovery Service (EDS). The other way of finding articles from a citation is by drilling down by using year, issue, volume and page numbers.

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ProQuest

Although not very big at Bank Street ProQuest is our “other” database provider (EBSCOhost is our main source). Through ProQuest we subscribe to three databases:

  • ebrary® e-books (very small)
  • Education Database
  • Gannett Newsstand (very small)

The database we are interested in, is the second one: Education Database.

OK, let’s find some articles in ProQuest. A search for articles on child life specialists nets a result list of 76,433 articles. We have checked the Full text box so we have something to read right now.

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We have options to select articles that are: Peer reviewed or published in Scholarly journals.

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Once you have selected an article you can read it as a PDF inside ProQuest or download it to your desktop. Don’t forget to look at Cite for an APA 6th Edition citation which you can copy and paste into your reference list (you may need to tweak).

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Something that works with some databases is to enclose search terms of three or more words in quotation marks – this tells the search engine to look for these words together.

If you are on the Advanced Search screen you can also add (or remove) extra search boxes.

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As you can see, we’ve cut down the number of articles in our result list to 57, but these articles are usually more focused  – give it a try!

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You can access ProQuest through the Library’s database web page:
bankstreet.edu > library > research-tools/research-database
https://www.bankstreet.edu/library/research-tools/research-databases/#P

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Google Keep

This very useful tool comes with your Bank Street email account (or any Google email account).

Versions

  • MAC and PC
  • iOS and Android (phone and tablet) – they all sync-up!
  • Chrome extension

To find Google Keep click the nine dot matrix on the top right-hand corner of your Google account. You may have to click the Even more from Google link to find the app icon – once you’ve found it, drag it to the top of you list of favorite apps.

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Features We Like

  • color coding
  • #tags and labels
  • very shareable (email and Google docs)
  • ability to add images and links
  • Reminders (YES!)
  • it looks pleasing to the eye
  • possible to move them around and archive them.

Definitely give Google Keep a try – this just might be the tool to keep you organized.

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EBSCO Discovery Service: Finding Articles

step1

  1. Go to the library homepage and type your topic in the search box
  2. Check the Search Everything is selected
  3. Hit the Go button.

step2

  1. You are on EBSCO’s Discovery  Service database page – you can see your topic
  2. There are 22,705, 113 items that meet your search criteria

EBSCO’s Discovery Service looks through all of our EBSCOhost database subscriptions and our catalog of books.

step3

Scroll down to the Limit to box and do the following:

  1. Check Full Text (this is important)
  2. Check Available in Library Collection (also important)
  3. Change the date range (last 10 years is good)
  4. Check Academic Journals under Source Types
  5. Look for articles that have PDF Full Text icons ( and save the articles you find interesting to your Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive).

step4

You can add Keywords to narrow down your search. Always keep an eye on the left hand side of your screen. Make sure that the limiters you want are checked.

step5

  1. Sometimes it interesting to look at different publications.
  2. Check Show More to see more publications.

Happy searching!

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RefME

RefME is an easy to use citation / reference list builder and it does a very nice job. You still have to know the basics of APA to make sure that what you’re doing is 100% correct but it does nearly all of the work for you – yay!

Features We Like

  • Scanning a book’s barcode
  • Copy and pasting a doi
  • Desktop and mobile version (iOS and Android), and a “web clipper”
  • RefME for Chrome – browser extension
  • Writes article and book titles in sentence case
  • Provides a parenthetical in-text citation example
  • It can change reference list styles (from MLA to APA) with the click of a button – very handy indeed!
  • You can copy and paste your reference list, or export it to MS Word.

Step 1 Find The DOI

The acronym DOI stands for digital object identifier – they are very useful. You can find them in database records and also hard copies of journals. Copy just the numbers to your clipboard.

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Step 2 Get Ready

  1. Make sure you are signed in to your free RefMe account
  2. Check that you have selected APA 6th citation style
  3. Create a folder for your project
  4. Now, you are ready to create a reference and citation.

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Step 3 Click, Paste & Search

  1. Select the source type, in the example below it’s a journal (Children’s Health Care)
  2. Paste the DOI
  3. Hit Search.

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Step 4 Search Result

If you need to, this is the place to tweak your entry, once you are happy click save. Oops! We need to make Developmentally lower case (i.e., developmentally).

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Step 5 Done!

  1. Our reference list entry looks pretty good- we added two more entries and RefME organized them alphabetically (n.b., we made developmentally lower case)
  2. There are options under Styles to change your list to a plethora of other styles, e.g., MLA, Chicago, Harvard
  3. And there are export options for completed reference lists to MS Word, Zotero, and Mendeley
  4. The three dots on the right allow you to export single entries.

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Recommendation

Definitively give RefME a workout. We don’t think you will be disappointed.

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Quick Guide to Finding a Book in the Library!

  1. Enter the title of the book you want to read. Make sure to select the “Book” button below the search box. Then hit “Go.”

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2. The next page shows you the results from your title search. To locate the book in the library click on the highlighted title: Yardsticks.

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3. After selecting the right book, the catalog will show you the book’s catalog record (picture below).

4. Before venturing out into the library to find the book, look for these 3 things on the record to help you find the book easier:

  1. Shelving Location: Where the book is located in the library.
  2. Call Number: The alpha-numeric code that tells you where the book is on the shelf (read the first number as a whole number, in this instance it’s 305).
  3. Availability: If the book is available for check-out it will say Available in green type. If the book is Checked-out or Lost the writing in the Availability column will be red type.

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5. Now go forth and find your book!

 

 

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Find Journals

Here’s how to go about  finding a journal article from a citation:

Sameroff, A. (2010). A unified theory of development: A dialectic integration of nature and nurture. Child Development, 81(1), 6-22.

Please note, the citation above doesn’t show a hanging indent😦
step1

  1. Write the name of the journal in the library’s front page search box
  2. Select the Find Journals radio button
  3. Hit Go.

step2

You have some results – let’s see which option meets our needs: 2010, volume 8, issue 1, pages 6-22

  1. Yes
  2. Yes (it’s in print in back of the library)
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
  5. Yes
  6. Yes (the best overall option as there is no full-text delay)

I decided to go with Academic Search Premiere (but I could go with any of the other options). Drill down to the year, volume and issue you are looking for, click the link!

step3

OK, nearly there.

step4

  1. Check to see if this is the article you are required to read
  2. Click the PDF Full Text icon to start reading
  3. Great! There are options to save this article to Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive.

If you haven’t already logged into your cloud storage account you’ll be prompted to do this now.

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