NYC Pride in the Library

Every year in June the Library mounts it’s annual NYC Pride display, and this year is no different.

IMG_1138.JPG

As a way to keep things in one place the Library created a research guide devoted to LGBTQIA+ Resources. It includes:

  • books in print for children and adults
  • “must visit” websites and twitter feeds
  • help with navigating databases for more academic works.
  • links to articles and reports
  • a list of LGBTQIA+ terms.

LGBTQIA+ resources can be also be found in the following research guides:

Finally, we have a take-home pamphlet available from the reference desk.

LGBTPride2017.png

Hope to see you at NYC Pride 2017.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Resources

14 Digit Library Barcode

What Numbers Do I Use?

We are really hoping to see “single sign-on” for everything at Bank Street, but until then, this is what you need to know. Once you have your ID card and get a 14 digit library issued barcode it’s all plain sailing ūüôā

front1

  • Above is a typical ID card with a student’s ID number in the top left-hand corner.
  • Underneath the photo is the student’s full name

back1

  • When you bring your ID card to the circulation desk, staff will place a 14 digit barcode on the back.
  • The numbers printed on the card are only useful for faculty.

Databases from Home

When asked for your 14 digit library barcode enter the 14 digits on the barcode on the back of your ID card (3). If you have been given a cohort access code enter that.

Renew & Place Holds on Books

Your username is your 14 digit library barcode (3). The password is changeme.

eReserves

Your instructor will email you the password.¬†Spoiler alert: there is a lot of clicking to do – keep at it and you’ll get there.

Printing

your username is the first part of your Bank Street email address. Usually it is the first letter of your first name and your last name (i.e., everything before the @ mark of your bankstreet email address). In the example about Joanne Student’s username would be jstudent (2). The password is your student ID, in the example above it would be 654123 (1).


If you are faculty, your username is the first part of your Bank Street email address. Your password is the 5 or 6 digit found on the back of your ID card (4).


Parents and guests ask for a print access card.

Save

Posted in News

Something About the Author (SATA)

We have been collecting and cataloging Something About the Author (SATA) for years, in fact we have 305 volumes as of May, 2017. If you are doing an author or illustrator study this is the resource you should be consulting.

Where are they?

You’ve probably seen them and thought they were encyclopedias. They are housed along the south wall windows in the reference area.

 

How do they work?

Good question. Each volume has three sections:

  1. New entries on new authors, and updates on authors found in earlier volumes.
  2. An index of illustrators
  3. An index of authors

What does this mean?

Looking at¬†an author index entry can be quite daunting at first. Here’s an example:

Kimmel, Eric A. 1946- ……………………. 304

Earlier sketches in SATA 13, 80, 125, 176, 208, 268

The main entry for Eric Kimmel is in volume 304, but there are also earlier entries in volumes 13, 80, 125, 176, 208, 268. Sometimes you may see the acronym CLR. It¬†stands for Children’s Literature Review¬†(a companion set to SATA, and yes we have that¬†too).

What’s inside a typical entry?

It really depends on the author but the following sections are common:

  • Personal information
  • Addresses
  • Career
  • Memberships
  • Awards, Honors
  • Writings
  • Adaptations
  • Sidelights
  • Biographical and Critical Sources

How would I cite an SATA entry?

Here is the pattern for an entry in a reference work with no byline (i.e., there is no author or date for the entry).

Title of the work. (year). In A. Editor (Ed.),  Title of the reference work (xx ed., Vol. xx. pp. xxx-xxx). Location: Publisher

Kimmel, Eric A. 1946-. (2017). In L. Kumar (Ed.), Something about the author (Vol. 304, pp. 94-103). Farmington, MI: Gale.

The following in-text citation would be sufficient (Kimmel, Eric A., 2017).

Summing Up

Although, it might be quicker to find something online, we can guarantee that your instructor will be extremely happy¬†you did something “old school” and consulted SATA.

 

Tagged with:
Posted in Resources

Loom

What is Loom?

Loom is a quick and easy way to make personal touch instructional videos.

Loom

Look & Feel

It’s very easy to record and share with Loom

  1. The default option is to have your face in a circle in the left-hand corner of the screen (very comforting for online students – yes, you are a real person). If you choose you can opt for no image at all.
  2. There are a number of different ways to share your video – twitter, facebook, gmail and an embed code for web-pages.
  3. If you’ve viewed the screen-cast before, it’s possible to fast forward up to 3X to the important part.
  4. You can also see the video in full-screen mode.

You can be up and running with Loom in 30 minutes.

Integration with Chrome & Firefox

To use Loom add it as a firefox Add-ons, and as a Chrome extension – You can also allow it to embed into your Gmail.

loom2

  1. You may not be able to see clearly but Loom appears as small gray flower, it becomes pink when it is active.
  2. It also appears inside Gmail where you can store screen-casts and reuse them again.

So, What Are the Downsides?

If you remember that Loom is an instructional product meant for showing and explaining how to do something right now¬† – there are no downsides. But videos are like snap chat – they “disappear” after seven days. However, if you get friends and co-workers to sign-up Loom can change that! At present it is not possible to annotate. Videos are limited to 10 minutes – but that’s a good thing ūüėÄ Give Loom a try (and did I mention it’s free).

Save

Tagged with:
Posted in News

EBSCO’s PlumX Update

A while back we looked at EBSCO’s PlumX Metrics as a way to find out an article’s popularity and how many times researchers have cited it.

In this post we did a simple search on English language learners and found this article. We looked for the flower graphic in the article’s record. We are mostly interested in the orange-red “petal” (citations).

PlumX-Metrics1.png

Clicking on the graphic will breakdown how readers have interacted with the text. Interestingly, some readers have saved this article to Mendeley, and Scopus says it has been cited by 11 researchers.PlumX Metrics2.png

Scopus lists the researchers who have cited the article. CrossRef seems to be the other citation indexer but it is not very informative.

PlumX-Metrics3.png

This is how Mendeley presents its interactions with the text. The Readership Statistics box makes interesting reading. If you scroll down you will see articles of a similar nature saved by others readers.

PlumX-Metrics4.png

PlumX is all about looking at the overall impact of an article. The article below is not about English language learners, it came up on a search on President Trump and generated no citations at all but was very popular on Twitter – you can see who tweeted and retweeted news.

PlumX-tweets.png

Depending on your purpose PlumX can be useful tool but it does pay to know what the “petal” colors mean:

  • green = usage
  • purple = captures
  • mustard = mentions (blogs)
  • teal = Social media (tweets)
  • orange-red = citations.
Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in News

Presidents’ Day 2017

presidents-day-2017

Tagged with: ,
Posted in News

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 2017

mlk2017

Tagged with: ,
Posted in News
Library on Instagram
Our new wall tattoo from Liz Wong. Pride 2017 kick-off party decoration. Thank you Eliza C. We're going live! Woot, woot! We have a new heavy-duty electric stapler (up to 45 pages). LGBTQ+ Visibility Project is up. Go see it in the lobby. The 2017 Josette Frank Award winner Wendelin Van Draanen for "The Secret Life of Lincoln Jones." Participating in the chair selection process for the 4th, 6th & 7th floors. This is our new meditation, prayer, nursing space.