EBSCO Discovery Service: Finding Articles


  1. Go to the library homepage and type your topic in the search box
  2. Check the Search Everything is selected
  3. Hit the Go button.


  1. You are on EBSCO’s Discovery  Service database page – you can see your topic
  2. There are 22,705, 113 items that meet your search criteria

EBSCO’s Discovery Service looks through all of our EBSCOhost database subscriptions and our catalog of books.


Scroll down to the Limit to box and do the following:

  1. Check Full Text (this is important)
  2. Check Available in Library Collection (also important)
  3. Change the date range (last 10 years is good)
  4. Check Academic Journals under Source Types
  5. Look for articles that have PDF Full Text icons ( and save the articles you find interesting to your Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive).


You can add Keywords to narrow down your search. Always keep an eye on the left hand side of your screen. Make sure that the limiters you want are checked.


  1. Sometimes it interesting to look at different publications.
  2. Check Show More to see more publications.

Happy searching!

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RefME is an easy to use citation / reference list builder and it does a very nice job. You still have to know the basics of APA to make sure that what you’re doing is 100% correct but it does nearly all of the work for you – yay!

Features We Like

  • Scanning a book’s barcode
  • Copy and pasting a doi
  • Desktop and mobile version (iOS and Android), and a “web clipper”
  • RefME for Chrome – browser extension
  • Writes article and book titles in sentence case
  • Provides a parenthetical in-text citation example
  • It can change reference list styles (from MLA to APA) with the click of a button – very handy indeed!
  • You can copy and paste your reference list, or export it to MS Word.

Step 1 Find The DOI

The acronym DOI stands for digital object identifier – they are very useful. You can find them in database records and also hard copies of journals. Copy just the numbers to your clipboard.


Step 2 Get Ready

  1. Make sure you are signed in to your free RefMe account
  2. Check that you have selected APA 6th citation style
  3. Create a folder for your project
  4. Now, you are ready to create a reference and citation.


Step 3 Click, Paste & Search

  1. Select the source type, in the example below it’s a journal (Children’s Health Care)
  2. Paste the DOI
  3. Hit Search.


Step 4 Search Result

If you need to, this is the place to tweak your entry, once you are happy click save. Oops! We need to make Developmentally lower case (i.e., developmentally).



Step 5 Done!

  1. Our reference list entry looks pretty good- we added two more entries and RefME organized them alphabetically (n.b., we made developmentally lower case)
  2. There are options under Styles to change your list to a plethora of other styles, e.g., MLA, Chicago, Harvard
  3. And there are export options for completed reference lists to MS Word, Zotero, and Mendeley
  4. The three dots on the right allow you to export single entries.



Definitively give RefME a workout. We don’t think you will be disappointed.



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Quick Guide to Finding a Book in the Library!

  1. Enter the title of the book you want to read. Make sure to select the “Book” button below the search box. Then hit “Go.”


2. The next page shows you the results from your title search. To locate the book in the library click on the highlighted title: Yardsticks.


3. After selecting the right book, the catalog will show you the book’s catalog record (picture below).

4. Before venturing out into the library to find the book, look for these 3 things on the record to help you find the book easier:

  1. Shelving Location: Where the book is located in the library.
  2. Call Number: The alpha-numeric code that tells you where the book is on the shelf (read the first number as a whole number, in this instance it’s 305).
  3. Availability: If the book is available for check-out it will say Available in green type. If the book is Checked-out or Lost the writing in the Availability column will be red type.


5. Now go forth and find your book!



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Find Journals

Here’s how to go about  finding a journal article from a citation:

Sameroff, A. (2010). A unified theory of development: A dialectic integration of nature and nurture. Child Development, 81(1), 6-22.

Please note, the citation above doesn’t show a hanging indent😦

  1. Write the name of the journal in the library’s front page search box
  2. Select the Find Journals radio button
  3. Hit Go.


You have some results – let’s see which option meets our needs: 2010, volume 8, issue 1, pages 6-22

  1. Yes
  2. Yes (it’s in print in back of the library)
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
  5. Yes
  6. Yes (the best overall option as there is no full-text delay)

I decided to go with Academic Search Premiere (but I could go with any of the other options). Drill down to the year, volume and issue you are looking for, click the link!


OK, nearly there.


  1. Check to see if this is the article you are required to read
  2. Click the PDF Full Text icon to start reading
  3. Great! There are options to save this article to Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive.

If you haven’t already logged into your cloud storage account you’ll be prompted to do this now.

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The PlumX widget is being added to EBSCO’s Discovery Service (EDS) sometime in August 2016. On the library’s website, EDS is accessed through the Search Everything button on the Library’s homepage.


This visual widget presents data based on the following five metric categories:

  1. Usage – The most sought after metric after citations
  2. Captures – A leading indicator of citations
  3. Mentions – Where people are truly engaging
  4. Social Media – Tracks the promotion and buzz of research
  5. Citations – When one document cites another

plum dropdown

In the past, students have had to rely on Google Scholar to ascertain an articles popularity. We’re hoping PlumX will become an additional tool for students to gather metrics.

Google Scholar



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Mental Measurements Yearbooks: 2016 Update

Buros has updated its website but you can still find all the information you need to read a test review in The Mental Measurements Yearbooks which the Library has in print (volumes 3rd – 19th).


  • On the Test Reviews Online page type in what you are looking for. In the example below we typed in the acronym for Test of Early Mathematics Ability (TEMA).
  • Hit SEARCH


Click the blue hyperlink Test of Early Mathematics Ability. Third Edition


  • Look  at the record and find the section called Reviewed In.
  • You should see information leading you to appropriate Mental Measurements Yearbook.


Finally, go to the Ready Reference area and locate the The Sixteenth Mental Measurements Yearbook.

Crehan, K. D. (2003). [Review of the Test of Early Mathematics Abbility, Third Edition]. In R. A. Spies, B. S. Plake, & L. L. Murphy (Eds.), The sixteenth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 1036-1038). Lincoln, NE: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.

Monsaas, J. A. (2003). [Review of the Test of Early Mathematics Abbility, Third Edition]. In R. A. Spies, B. S. Plake, & L. L. Murphy (Eds.), The sixteenth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 1038-1040). Lincoln, NE: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.





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Uploading Articles from EDS to Google Drive

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